This course is designed to give you a good understanding of the basics of business finance. You will learn how businesses are funded and what the money’s used for; how they make profits and generate cash; how to measure business performance; where to find the information you’ll need.  You’ll see how income statements and balance sheets work and you’ll also understand key financial jargon, concepts and commonly used financial metrics. 
Key Information Course Code: AFB101 Duration: 2 weeks Fee: £4145 Course outline Introduction to Accounting The two forms of accounting: financial accounting and management accounting The regulatory and conceptual framework Qualitative characteristics of useful financial information Types of business entity The annual report and financial statements Accounting Concepts and Systems Statement of comprehensive income (income statement) Statement of financial position (balance sheet) Statement of cash flows Preparing a set of financial statements The income statement: the cost of sales working Underlying concepts: measurement rules and fundamental accounting concepts Three further property, plant and equipment issues Recording accounting information Financial Analysis: Part 1 Financial statement analysis for investment purposes Other users and their needs Horizontal analysis and trend analysis Vertical analysis Ratio analysis Weaknesses and limitations Financial Analysis: Part 2 The drive for information Stakeholder management Corporate social responsibility reporting Earnings announcements, conference calls, and investor presentations Media relations: press releases and newspaper coverage Social media and internet bulletins Business Planning Business planning and control: the role of budgets The budget-setting process Basic steps of preparing a budget Budgeting in different types of organization Limitations and problems with budgeting Improving business planning and budgeting Budgets and Performance Management Responsibility centers The controllability principle Profit-related performance measurement Standard costing and variance analysis Performance management in investment centers Non-financial performance indicators The balanced scorecard Performance measurement in not-for-profit organizations External influences on performance Cash Flow How much cash does a business need? Methods of establishing cash balances Cash forecasting: the cash budget Cash... [-]

Six videos that will cover everything you need to understand and repair your credit “What credit repair is and how it works”, “Obtaining and understanding your credit reports and scores”, “How to dispute with the credit Bureaus”, “Identity theft disputes and fraud alerts”, “Pay to delete process and strategy (debt negotiation)”, and “legal liabilities, statute of limitations, and advanced dispute tactics”. (All videos available immediately)
If that doesn’t work, the Federal Trade Commission offers a sample letter you can use as a template to make disputes. Include copies of any documents that support your dispute (always keep the originals for yourself). State only the facts in your letter and concisely express why you are making the dispute. Send the letter by certified mail with “return receipt requested: to verify when the bureau received your dispute.
Secured cards are a great way to build or improve credit. When you open a secured card, you submit a security deposit that typically becomes your credit limit. This deposit acts as collateral if you default on your account, but you can get it back if you close your account after paying off your balance. As long as you use a secured card responsibly — for example, make on-time payments and use little of your available credit — you may see improvements in your credit score. Unfortunately, in addition to the upfront deposit, this credit-building tool can have extra costs, like an annual fee.
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