Do not close your secured card until you are approved for a new credit card. Once you are approved for your new credit card, call the bank that issued your secured card. Tell them that you are going to close the account unless they convert you to a secured card. It is always worthwhile trying to get the conversion, and here you will be making a threat that you will keep. Because, if they don’t convert your card, you will close it. That means you will likely end up in retention unit.
If you already have a good-to-excellent credit score and a low debt-to-income ratio, you may want to consider refinancing your student loans. When you refinance your loans, you take out a new credit-based private student loan and use the money to pay off some or all of your current loans. (The lender will generally send the money directly to your loan servicers.)
The best way to improve your score is to have good behavior reported every single month. For example, you can take out a secured credit card and use it monthly. Charge no more than 10% of the available credit limit, and pay the balance in full and on time every month. Your credit score will improve as your negative information ages and your credit report fills with positive information.
Write the reporting company and tell them what you think is wrong about their report and include copies (not originals) of any documents you have to support your claim. State the facts of the issue – not how you feel about it – and tell them you expect them to correct the mistake immediately. Keep a copy of your letter but send it by registered mail so you have proof they received it. It also shows the company that you are serious.
Do not close your secured card until you are approved for a new credit card. Once you are approved for your new credit card, call the bank that issued your secured card. Tell them that you are going to close the account unless they convert you to a secured card. It is always worthwhile trying to get the conversion, and here you will be making a threat that you will keep. Because, if they don’t convert your card, you will close it. That means you will likely end up in retention unit.

In this section, you will learn how to read a credit report. At the end of this video, you will know how to determine if the accounts listed on your report belong to you, view any accounts that went bad, any legitimate derogatory accounts, how to contact each company that reports to your credit report, and how to see if your actual identity was stolen, not just your credit card number.
In the credit repair industry, learning never stops. There are always new innovative ideas and daunting issues to tackle. This is where the need for our workshop comes in. There are so many variables to put into consideration when resolving credit inaccuracies which one person cannot know the answer to. In these detailed, targeted workshops, we teach and rub minds together on different aspects of the credit repair industry. In some of our workshops, we have special guest speakers who have gained invaluable experience over several years of service and are well knowledgeable about the workings of the industry disclose important techniques that you can use to grow your business massively. The time spent during every workshop range from 30 minutes to 1- hour, be assured you’ll spend this time amassing valuable knowledge.
You can definitely build your credit from scratch by working to improve the factors that go into your score — except for the length of credit history. It’s impossible to travel back in time to open a credit account, so improving this factor just takes patience. Luckily, the length of your credit history isn’t the most important thing that determines your score.
As an ICFE Certified Credit Repair Specialist –CCRS™ you will teach clients how to obtain their credit reports from the three major CRAs. When the client has his or her credit reports in hand, you will review their credit reports, page-by-page, with the client present. The average credit report review and checking for mistakes takes about an hour and fifteen minutes.  Utilize the Credit File Review form on the CCRS™ Resource CD.

At that point, they (the company who first reported the negative information about you) have to do their own research and report back to the reporting agencies. If they determine that they made a mistake, they have to let the three reporting agencies know about it, and they will then correct your credit report file and give you a free report showing the correction.
In this course, we will discuss fundamental principles of trading off risk and return, portfolio optimization, and security pricing. We will study and use risk-return models such as the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and multi-factor models to evaluate the performance of various securities and portfolios. Specifically, we will learn how to interpret and estimate regressions that provide us with both a benchmark to use for a security given its risk (determined by its beta), as well as a risk-adjusted measure of the security’s performance (measured by its alpha). Building upon this framework, market efficiency and its implications for patterns in stock returns and the asset-management industry will be discussed. Finally, the course will conclude by connecting investment finance with corporate finance by examining firm valuation techniques such as the use of market multiples and discounted cash flow analysis. The course emphasizes real-world examples and applications in Excel throughout. This course is the first of two on Investments that I am offering online (“Investments II: Lessons and Applications for Investors” is the second course). The over-arching goals of this course are to build an understanding of the fundamentals of investment finance and provide an ability to implement key asset-pricing models and firm-valuation techniques in real-world situations. Specifically, upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to: • Explain the tradeoffs between risk and return • Form a portfolio of securities and calculate the expected return and standard deviation of that portfolio • Understand the real-world implications of the Separation Theorem of investments • Use the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and 3-Factor Model to evaluate the performance of an asset (like stocks) through regression analysis • Estimate and interpret the ALPHA (α) and BETA (β) of a security, two statistics commonly reported on financial websites • Describe what is meant by market efficiency and what it implies for patterns in stock returns and for the asset-management industry • Understand market multiples and income approaches to valuing a firm and its stock, as well as the sensitivity of each approach to assumptions made • Conduct specific examples of a market multiples valuation and a discounted cash flow valuation This course was previously entitled “Financial Evaluation and Strategy: Investments” and was part of a previous specialization entitled "Improving Business and Finances Operations", which is now closed to new learner enrollment. “Financial Evaluation and Strategy: Investments” received an average rating of 4.8 out of 5 based on 199 reviews over the period August 2015 through August 2016. You can view a detailed summary of the ratings and reviews for this course in the Course Overview section. This course is part of the iMBA offered by the University of Illinois, a flexible, fully-accredited online MBA at an incredibly competitive price. For more information, please see the Resource page in this course and onlinemba.illinois.edu.
×