On top of this, about 37 percent of all consumer debt is in revolving credit, which is most commonly seen as credit card debt -- 63 percent in total -- and includes car loans, student loans, loans on other items like boats, trailers, and even vacations. In terms of car loans, the average loan is about $29,000, with the loan to value ratio being 94 percent, which means that down payments are about 6 percent.
If you have good credit and are responsible with your personal finances, you may be interested in sharing your expertise with others as a credit repair specialist. While there aren't specific requirements to be a credit repair specialist, there are certifications you can get that will make you more trustworthy to potential clients. Once you have the appropriate education and training, you can look for a position with an established agency or strike out on your own as an independent credit repair specialist.[1]
Before returning to his alma mater Boston College where he received a Ph.D. in Finance, Professor Gibson worked as an analyst with Fidelity Investments and as a credit team leader serving a Fortune 500 clientele with HSBC Bank. Lecturing about corporate finance and the creation of shareholder value, he has received numerous teaching awards at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels. He has also been named as an outstanding faculty member in Business Week’s Guide to the Best Business Schools. Professor Gibson currently serves as an editorial board member of the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ).
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